Remove (most of) J from ABCL.

parent 7d5ad577
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN">
<html>
<head>
<title>J User's Guide - Frequently Asked Questions</title>
<LINK REL="stylesheet" HREF="j.css" TYPE="text/css">
</head>
<body>
<a href="contents.html">Top</a>
<hr>
<h1>Frequently Asked Questions</h1>
<hr>
<p>
<b>How do I get j to use the ISO-8859-2 encoding when loading and saving files?</b>
</p>
<p>
Add the following line to your <a href="preferences.html">preferences</a> file:
</p>
<pre>
defaultEncoding = ISO8859_2</pre>
<p>
<b>What's up with the Tab key?</b>
</p>
<p>
In programming modes (including Java, JavaScript, C, C++, PHP, Python, HTML,
and XML), the Tab key is mapped by default to the command
<a href="commands.html#tab">tab</a>. The default behavior of this command is
to re-indent the current line according to j's idea of correct indentation.
</p>
<p>
If you want to get rid of this behavior, you can create a custom key map for
the mode in question that maps the Tab key to <a href="commands.html#insertTab">insertTab</a>
(see <a href="keys.html">Key Mappings</a>). You might also want to map some other key to
<a href="commands.html#indentLineOrRegion">indentLineOrRegion</a>, which
provides the re-indentation functionality assigned by default to the Tab key.
</p>
<p>
A less radical step is to add the following line to your <a href="preferences.html">preferences</a>
file:
<pre>
tabAlwaysIndent = false</pre>
If <a href="commands.html#tabAlwaysIndent">tabAlwaysIndent</a> is false, the behavior of
the tab command depends on the location of the caret.
If the caret is at the very beginning of the text on the line, or in the
whitespace to the left of the text, tab calls <a href="commands.html#indentLine">indentLine</a>.
If the caret is in the midst of the actual text on the line, tab
inserts either a single tab character or the equivalent number of spaces,
depending on the setting of the <a href="preferences.html#useTabs">useTabs</a> property.
<p>
<code>tabAlwaysIndent</code> is true by default.
</p>
<p>
<code>tabAlwaysIndent</code> is a mode-specific property,
so you can set it for a specific mode if that's what you want:
<pre>
JavaMode.tabAlwaysIndent = false</pre>
<p>
<b>Why don't certain keys work in j?</b>
</p>
<p>
There is no single answer to this question.
</p>
<p>
There are <a href="http://developer.java.sun.com/developer/bugParade/bugs/4371923.html">known bugs</a>
on specific platforms with specific versions of Java and certain keyboards
(German, Swedish, and possibly others). If you suspect that this is your
problem, you might try switching to another version of Java. On Linux, IBM
1.3 seems to have the fewest problems, and Blackdown's version of 1.3 seems
to be better than Sun's. But your mileage may vary. In any case, if the key
in question doesn't work with the Swing Notepad demo, there's not much chance
that it will work in j. Complain to your Java vendor!
</p>
<p>
If the key in question works with the Swing Notepad demo but does not work
with j, please <a href="mailto:peter@armedbear.org">let me know</a>. Be sure
to mention what platform you're running on, what version of Java you're
using, and your locale.
</p>
<p>
The command <a href="commands.html#insertKeyText">insertKeyText</a> may be
useful in debugging keyboard problems.
</p>
<p>
<b> When selecting text with the keyboard, if I want to select multiple
lines, the first line is always selected completely. If I just want to
select part of the first line, I've got to do it with the mouse.</b>
</p>
<p>
That's not a bug, that's a feature (really). The idea is that selecting
whole lines is the more common case when the selection spans multiple lines,
so j tries to save you an extra keystroke in that situation.
</p>
<p>
When you just want to select part of the text on the first line, you can use
the left or right arrow key to select a single character first, and then use
the up or down key to extend the selection. This costs you an extra
keystroke, but it's the less common case. Or at least that's the idea.
</p>
<p>
If you don't like this behavior, you can disable it by adding the following
line to your <a href="preferences.html">preferences</a> file:
<pre>
autoSelectLine = false</pre>
<p>
<b> I just upgraded to Mac OS X 10.2, and now j has odd display problems.</b>
</p>
<p>
It may help to disable hardware acceleration when starting j:
<pre>
java -Dcom.apple.hwaccel=false -jar j.jar</pre>
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN">
<html>
<head>
<title>J User's Guide - Aliases</title>
<LINK REL="stylesheet" HREF="j.css" TYPE="text/css">
</head>
<body>
<a href="contents.html">Top</a>
<hr>
<h1>Aliases</h1>
<hr>
<p>
<a href="commands.html#openFile">openFile</a> and
<a href="commands.html#executeCommand">executeCommand</a> support the use of
aliases.
<p>
To define an alias, use the command <a href="commands.html#alias">alias</a>,
which you can invoke using
<a href="commands.html#executeCommand">executeCommand</a> (mapped by default
to Alt X).
<p>
Usage:
<pre>
alias key=value</pre>
<p>
For example:
<pre>
alias notes=/home/peter/notes</pre>
or
<pre>
alias pf=man perlfunc</pre>
<p>
The '=' is optional; a space will do as well. Keys may not contain embedded
spaces.
<p>
If you want to define an alias for the current file, you can use "here" as a
shortcut:
<pre>
alias notes here</pre>
<p>
Once you've defined an alias, you can use the key ("notes" or "pf") instead of
the value ("/home/peter/notes" or "man perlfunc") with
<a href="commands.html#openFile">openFile</a> or
<a href="commands.html#executeCommand">executeCommand</a>. J simply substitues
the value for the key when you press Enter in the location bar textfield.
<p>
To unset an alias, set it to nothing:
<pre>
alias notes=</pre>
You can bring up a dialog box to edit the value of an alias by invoking
<a href="commands.html#alias">alias</a> with no arguments or by specifying
just the key:
<pre>
alias notes</pre>
<p>
Aliases are stored in the file ~/.j/aliases, or C:\.j\aliases on Windows,
unless you specify a different home directory when starting j (see
<a href="preferences.html">Preferences</a>). You can edit this file to add,
remove, or modify aliases as long as you maintain the same format. If you use
j to edit your aliases file, the running instance of j automatically reloads
your aliases when you save the changes to the file, so it is not necessary to
restart j in order to pick up the new aliases.
<p>
J itself defines three system aliases which may not be changed: "prefs" is an
alias for j's <a href="preferences.html">preferences file</a>, "aliases" is an
alias for the file that contains the aliases themselves, and "inbox" is an
alias for the user's default inbox, if any, as specified in the preferences
file (see <a href="preferences.html#inbox">inbox</a>).
</body>
</html>
\ No newline at end of file
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN">
<html>
<head>
<title>J User's Guide - Archive Buffers</title>
<LINK REL="stylesheet" HREF="j.css" TYPE="text/css">
</head>
<body>
<a href="contents.html">Top</a>
<hr>
<h1>Archive Buffers</h1>
<hr>
<p>
This page isn't here yet!
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN">
<html>
<head>
<title>J User's Guide - Autosave, Crash Recovery and Backups</title>
<LINK REL="stylesheet" HREF="j.css" TYPE="text/css">
</head>
<body>
<a href="contents.html">Top</a>
<hr>
<h1>Autosave, Crash Recovery and Backups</h1>
<hr>
<p>
To minimize loss of work in the event of a crash, j autosaves each modified
buffer whenever there is no user activity for a minimum of two seconds. This
has no effect on the file you're editing; modified buffers are written out to
temporary files in j's autosave directory (which is normally
<code>~/.j/autosave</code> on Unix or <code>C:\.j\autosave</code> on Windows,
but see below).
<p>
Whenever you explicitly save a file, the corresponding autosave file is
deleted. When j exits normally, all the autosave files are deleted. If a crash
occurs, the autosave files will still be around when you restart j, and j will
ask you, one by one, if you want to recover the files in question. If you say
yes, the file will be restored from the corresponding autosave file. If you say
no, j will offer to delete the autosave file. If you choose not to delete the
autosave file, it will remain in the autosave directory for perusal and
disposition at your leisure.
<p>
Whenever you explicitly save a file, a backup of the file is written to the
backup directory, which by default is a directory called <code>backup</code>
located in the home directory of the current user (i.e. <code>~/backup</code>
on Unix).
<p>
On Windows, the home directory of the current user normally defaults to
<code>C:\</code> (the default is actually the root directory of the first
writable drive, excluding <code>A:</code> and <code>B:</code>), so the default
backup directory on Windows is normally <code>C:\backup</code>.
<p>
You can specify a different home directory by starting j with the
<code>--home</code> command line option:
<pre>
j --home=C:\ArmedBear
</pre>
In this case your home directory, as far as j is concerned, will be
<code>C:\ArmedBear</code>, the <code>.j</code> directory will be
<code>C:\ArmedBear\.j</code>, autosave files will be stored in
<code>C:\ArmedBear\.j\autosave</code>, and the default backup directory will be
<code>C:\ArmedBear\backup</code>.
<p>
You can specify the location of the backup directory separately by setting the
<code>backupDirectory</code> property in your
<a href="preferences.html">preferences</a> file:
<pre>
backupDirectory=/home/peter/work/backup
</pre>
The backup file (in the backup directory) always has the same name as the original file.
<p>
It's a good idea to visit your backup directory occasionally and clean it out;
there is no mechanism in j to do this automatically.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN">
<html>
<head>
<title>J User's Guide - Building the Source</title>
<LINK REL="stylesheet" HREF="j.css" TYPE="text/css">
</head>
<body>
<a href="contents.html">Top</a>
<hr>
<h1>Building the Source</h1>
<hr>
<p>
<b>Using configure and make</b>
<p>
This is the recommended build system on Unix platforms. On Windows, you are
more likely to succeed with Ant; see <a href="#Using_Ant">below</a>.
<p>
For Linux:
<pre>
$ ./configure --with-jdk=DIR
$ make
$ make install
</pre>
The <code>--with-jdk</code> option is <b>always</b> required,
in order to specify which JDK to use (give the full path of its top-level directory).
<p>
On Mac OS X, the --with-jdk option should be specified like this:
<pre>
--with-jdk=/System/Library/Frameworks/JavaVM.framework
</pre>
<p>
You can use the <code>--with-extensions</code> option to specify extensions to
the <code>CLASSPATH</code>. For example, you may want to build j with support
for an external XML parser:
<pre>
$ ./configure ... --with-extensions=/usr/share/java/xerces.jar
</pre>
Extensions specified in this way are added to the <code>CLASSPATH</code> both
during the build process and at runtime.
<p>
<a name="jpty"></a>If you want to use certain experimental features such as
shell and ssh buffers, you should specify the <code>--enable-jpty</code> option
(you will also need to set <code>enableExperimentalFeatures=true</code> in your
<a href="preferences.html">preferences</a> file).
<p>
By default, j will be installed in /usr/local/bin.
<p>
After you've built and installed j, you should be able to invoke it from the
command line by just typing
<pre>
$ j
</pre>
if /usr/local/bin is in your path.
<p>
<b><a name="Using_Ant">Using Ant</a></b>
<p>
<a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/ant">Ant</a> is the recommended build system
on Windows. Version 1.4.1 or later of Ant is required.
<p>
Change into the root directory of the j source distribution and edit the file
build.properties to suit your situation. Then:
<pre>
C:\j-0.21.0> ant all
</pre>
This will build j.jar and generate a batch file, j.bat, that you can use to
launch j.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN">
<html>
<head>
<title>J User's Guide - Columns</title>
<LINK REL="stylesheet" HREF="j.css" TYPE="text/css">
</head>
<body>
<a href="contents.html">Top</a>
<hr>
<h1>Columns</h1>
<hr>
<p>
Cut, copy and paste operations are supported on columns (rectangular areas
of text), as well as on ordinary regions.
</p>
<p>
To mark a column, put the caret at one corner of the desired area and
control shift left click with the mouse at the opposite corner. If things
go well, the column will be highlighted appropriately.
</p>
<p>
Once a column is marked, the commands
<a href="commands.html#copyRegion">copyRegion</a>, mapped by default to
Ctrl C, <a href="commands.html#killRegion">killRegion</a>, mapped by
default to Ctrl X, and <a href="commands.html#delete">delete</a>, mapped
by default to Delete, act on the marked column.
</p>
<p>
The contents of the last column to be copied or killed are saved, and can
subsequently be retrieved with the command
<a href="commands.html#pasteColumn">pasteColumn</a>.
</p>
<p>
Copied or killed columns are not stored in the kill ring, so
<a href="commands.html#cyclePaste">cyclePaste</a> cannot be used with
columns.
</p>
</body>
</html>
\ No newline at end of file
This source diff could not be displayed because it is too large. You can view the blob instead.
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN">
<html>
<head>
<title>J User's Guide - Compilation Buffers</title>
<LINK REL="stylesheet" HREF="j.css" TYPE="text/css">
</head>
<body>
<a href="contents.html">Top</a>
<hr>
<h1>Compilation Buffers</h1>
<hr>
<p>
J can run compilers for languages like Java and C, redirecting the output into
a compilation buffer. For some compilers, including javac, jikes, gcc, and
Microsoft C/C++, j can also parse the compiler's error messages and jump to the
location in the source file where the error occurred. (Please note that on
Windows, compilation buffers are only supported for Windows NT 4, Windows 2000
and Windows XP.)
</p>
<p>
The command <a href="commands.html#compile">compile</a>, mapped by default to
F9, can be used to run make,
<a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/ant/index.html">Ant</a>, or a compiler. You
will be prompted for the compile command. The current directory (the directory
of the file in the current buffer) is used as the working directory for the
execution of the compile command, so if you're using make or Ant, the Makefile
or build.xml in the current directory will be used by default.
</p>
<p>
The command <a href="commands.html#recompile">recompile</a>, mapped by default
to Ctrl F9, repeats the last compile command you specified. To make this
command more useful, you can use the dynamic alias "here" in your compile
command to represent the full pathname of the current file (the file in the
current buffer).
<p>
For example, you could specify the compile command:
<pre>
javac -classpath /home/peter/j/src here</pre>
Then you could use <a href="commands.html#recompile">recompile</a> in any
buffer containing a Java source file to run javac (with the specified
classpath) on that particular file.
<p>
When you start a compilation, j displays the compilation buffer in another
window, splitting the current window if necessary. Keyboard focus remains in
the source window.
</p>
<p>
If the compilation completes without error, you can use
<a href="commands.html#escape">escape</a>, mapped by default to Escape, to
kill the compilation buffer and unsplit the window.
</p>
<p>
If there are errors, you can use the commands
<a href="commands.html#nextError">nextError</a>, mapped by default to F4, and
<a href="commands.html#previousError">previousError</a>, mapped by default to
Shift F4, to jump to the location of each error in the source.
</p>
<p>
In the compilation buffer itself, the command
<a href="commands.html#thisError">thisError</a>, mapped by default to Enter,
jumps to the location in the source file that corresponds to the error message
at the current location of the caret.
(<a href="commands.html#thisError">thisError</a> is also mapped by default to
Ctrl Shift G, left button double click, and middle button single click.)
</p>
<p>
The
command <a href="commands.html#showMessage">showMessage</a>, mapped by default
to Ctrl Shift M, displays the full text of the current error message.
</p>
<p>
Note that when using jikes, you must specify the +D flag in the compile
command (or Makefile) in order for j to be able to parse the error messages
correctly:
<pre>
jikes +D [...] here</pre>
When using ant, you should set the build.compiler.emacs property:
<pre>
build.compiler.emacs=on</pre>
</body>
</html>
\ No newline at end of file
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN">
<html>
<head>
<title>J User's Guide</title>
<LINK REL="stylesheet" HREF="j.css" TYPE="text/css">
</head>
<body>
<hr>
<h1>J User's Guide</h1>
<hr>
<h2>Contents</h2>
<ul>
<li><a href="terms.html">Credits and Terms of Use</a></li>
<li><a href="install.html">Installation</a></li>
<li><a href="commands.html">Commands</a></li>
<li><a href="keys.html">Key Mappings</a></li>
<li><a href="autosave.html">Autosave, Crash Recovery and Backups</a></li>
<li><a href="modes.html">Modes</a></li>
<li><a href="lispmode.html">Lisp Mode</a></li>
<li><a href="xmlmode.html">XML Mode</a></li>
<li><a href="directories.html">Directory Buffers</a></li>
<li><a href="archives.html">Archive Buffers</a></li>
<li><a href="compilation.html">Compilation Buffers</a></li>
<li><a href="cvs.html">CVS Support</a></li>
<li><a href="jdb.html">The Java Debugger</a></li>
<li><a href="jdbcommands.html">Debugger Commands</a></li>
<li><a href="imagebuffers.html">Image Buffers</a></li>
<li><a href="mail.html">Mail</a></li>
<li><a href="killring.html">The Kill Ring</a></li>
<li><a href="columns.html">Columns</a></li>
<li><a href="tags.html">Tags and Tag Files</a></li>
<li><a href="indentation.html">Indentation</a></li>
<li><a href="regexp.html">Regular Expressions</a></li>
<li><a href="statusbar.html">The Status Bar</a></li>
<li><a href="aliases.html">Aliases</a></li>
<li><a href="sessions.html">Sessions</a></li>
<li><a href="preferences.html">Preferences</a></li>
<li><a href="themes.html">Themes</a></li>
<li><a href="extensions.html">Extending J</a></li>
<li><a href="java.html">Calling Java From Lisp</a></li>
<li><a href="init.lisp.html">init.lisp</a></li>
<li><a href="initialization.html">init.bsh</a></li>
<li><a href="logging.html">Logging</a></li>
<li><a href="building.html">Building the Source</a></li>
<li><a href="FAQ.html">FAQ</a></li>
</ul>
</body>
</html>
\ No newline at end of file
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN">
<html>
<head>
<title>J User's Guide - CVS Support</title>
<LINK REL="stylesheet" HREF="j.css" TYPE="text/css">
</head>
<body>