ASDF

Another System Definition Facility

ASDF 2

We released ASDF 2 on May 31st 2010. It will hopefully be bundled will all official releases of Common Lisp implementations made after that date.

What it is

ASDF is a tool for describing how source files are organized: what depends on which and when.

It is roughly what Common Lisp hackers use to build software where C hackers would use say GNU Make.

ASDF stands for Another System Definition Facility, in the continuity of the Lisp DEFSYSTEM of yore.

What it is not

ASDF will not download missing software components for you. For that, you want quicklisp. (quicklisp builds upon ASDF.)

Documentation

You can read our manual:

Regarding the internal design of ASDF and the work we did on ASDF 2, see the last draft version of our paper for ILC 2010, Evolving ASDF: More Cooperation, Less Coordination

Getting it

Though they may lag behind the version here, ASDF comes bundled with most Lisps. To get the greatest and latest, you can:

Reporting Bugs

To report bugs, you can use our launchpad project. If you're unsure about the bug or want to discuss how to fix it, you can send email to the project mailing-list below.

Mailing List

Contributing

Join our mailing list, check the code out from git, send questions, ideas and patches!

What is happening

Since December 2009
François-René Rideau is de facto maintainer, with notable contributions from Robert P. Goldman, Juanjo Garcia-Ripoll and James Anderson. ASDF 2 released with many clean-ups, better configurability and updated documentation.
May 2006 to November 2009
Gary King is de facto maintainer, with notable contributions from Robert P. Goldman, Nikodemus Siivola, Christophe Rhodes, Daniel Herring. Many small features and bug fixes, making the project more maintanable, moving to using git and common-lisp.net.
May 2004 to April 2006
Christophe Rhodes is de facto maintainer, with notable contributions from Nikodemus Siivola, Peter Van Eynde, Edi Weitz, Kevin Rosenberg. The system made more robust, a few more features.
August 2001 to May 2004
Developed by Daniel Barlow, with notable contributions from Christophe Rhodes, Kevin Rosenberg, Edi Weitz, Rahul Jain.
August 2001
Created by Daniel Barlow