Commit 15655145 authored by Raymond Toy's avatar Raymond Toy

Fix some incorrect markdown markup

parent cb825da9
Pipeline #646 passed with stage
in 25 minutes and 21 seconds
......@@ -12,13 +12,13 @@ General Requirements
In order to build CMU CL, you will need:
a. A working CMU CL binary. There is no way around this requirement!
1. A working CMU CL binary. There is no way around this requirement!
This binary can either be for the platform you want to target, in
that case you can either recompile or cross-compile, or for another
supported platform, in that case you must cross-compile, obviously.
a. A supported C compiler for the C runtime code.
1. A supported C compiler for the C runtime code.
Most of the time, this means GNU gcc, though for some ports it
means the vendor-supplied C compiler. The compiler must be
......@@ -27,13 +27,13 @@ a. A supported C compiler for the C runtime code.
Note for FreeBSD 10 and above: The build requires gcc (Clang will
not work) and the lib32 compatiblity package.
a. GNU make
1. GNU make
This has to be available either as gmake or make in your PATH, or
the MAKE environment variable has to be set to point to the correct
binary.
a. The CMU CL source code
1. The CMU CL source code
Here you can either use one of the release source tarballs, or
check out the source code directly from the public CMUCL git
......@@ -51,14 +51,14 @@ Setting up a build environment
mkdir cmucl ; cd cmucl
2.) Fetch the sources and put them into the base directory
2. Fetch the sources and put them into the base directory
```
tar xzf /tmp/cmucl-source.tar.gz
```
or, if you want to use the git sources directly:
```
git clone https://gitlab.common-lisp.net/cmucl/cmucl.git
```
Whatever you do, the sources must be in a directory named src
inside the base directory. Since the build tools keep all
generated files in separate target directories, the src directory
......@@ -247,195 +247,195 @@ Overview of the included build scripts
* bin/build.sh [-123obvuBCU?]
This is the main build script. It essentially calls the other build
scripts described below in the proper sequence to build cmucl from an
existing binary of cmucl.
This is the main build script. It essentially calls the other build
scripts described below in the proper sequence to build cmucl from an
existing binary of cmucl.
* bin/create-target.sh target-directory [lisp-variant [motif-variant]]
This script creates a new target directory, which is a shadow of the
source directory, that will contain all the files that are created by
the build process. Thus, each target's files are completely separate
from the src directory, which could, in fact, be read-only. Hence you
can simultaneously build CMUCL for different targets from the same
source directory.
The first argument is the name of the target directory to create. The
remaining arguments are optional. If they are not given, the script
tries to determine the lisp variant and motif variant from the system
the script is running on.
The lisp-variant (i.e. the suffix of the src/lisp/Config.* to use as
the target's Config file), and optionally the motif-variant (again the
suffix of the src/motif/server/Config.* file to use as the Config file
for the target's CMUCL/Motif server code). If the lisp-variant is
given but the motif-variant is not, the motif-variant is determined
from the lisp-variant.
The script will generate the target directory tree, link the relevant
Config files, and generate place-holder files for various files, in
order to ensure proper operation of the other build-scripts. It also
creates a sample setenv.lisp file in the target directory, which is
used by the build and load processes to set up the correct list of
*features* for your target lisp core.
IMPORTANT: You will normally NOT have to modify the sample setenv.lisp
file, if you are building from a binary that has the desired features.
In fact, the sample has all code commented out, If you want to add or
remove features, you need to include code that puts at least a minimal
set of features onto the list (use PUSHNEW and/or REMOVE). You can
use the current set of *features* of your lisp as a first guide. The
sample setenv.lisp includes a set of features that should work for the
intended configuration. Note also that some adding or removing some
features may require a cross-compile instead of a normal compile.
This script creates a new target directory, which is a shadow of the
source directory, that will contain all the files that are created by
the build process. Thus, each target's files are completely separate
from the src directory, which could, in fact, be read-only. Hence you
can simultaneously build CMUCL for different targets from the same
source directory.
The first argument is the name of the target directory to create. The
remaining arguments are optional. If they are not given, the script
tries to determine the lisp variant and motif variant from the system
the script is running on.
The lisp-variant (i.e. the suffix of the src/lisp/Config.* to use as
the target's Config file), and optionally the motif-variant (again the
suffix of the src/motif/server/Config.* file to use as the Config file
for the target's CMUCL/Motif server code). If the lisp-variant is
given but the motif-variant is not, the motif-variant is determined
from the lisp-variant.
The script will generate the target directory tree, link the relevant
Config files, and generate place-holder files for various files, in
order to ensure proper operation of the other build-scripts. It also
creates a sample setenv.lisp file in the target directory, which is
used by the build and load processes to set up the correct list of
*features* for your target lisp core.
IMPORTANT: You will normally NOT have to modify the sample setenv.lisp
file, if you are building from a binary that has the desired features.
In fact, the sample has all code commented out, If you want to add or
remove features, you need to include code that puts at least a minimal
set of features onto the list (use PUSHNEW and/or REMOVE). You can
use the current set of *features* of your lisp as a first guide. The
sample setenv.lisp includes a set of features that should work for the
intended configuration. Note also that some adding or removing some
features may require a cross-compile instead of a normal compile.
* bin/clean-target.sh [-l] target-directory [more dirs]
Cleans the given target directory, so that all created files will be
removed. This is useful to force recompilation. If the -l flag is
given, then the C runtime is also removed, including all the lisp
executable, any lisp cores, all object files, lisp.nm, internals.h,
and the config file.
Cleans the given target directory, so that all created files will be
removed. This is useful to force recompilation. If the -l flag is
given, then the C runtime is also removed, including all the lisp
executable, any lisp cores, all object files, lisp.nm, internals.h,
and the config file.
* bin/build-world.sh target-directory [build-binary] [build-flags...]
Starts a complete world build for the given target, using the lisp
binary/core specified as a build host. The recompilation step will
only recompile changed files, or files for which the fasl files are
missing. It will also not recompile the C runtime code (the lisp
binary). If a (re)compilation of that code is needed, the genesis
step of the world build will inform you of that fact. In that case,
you'll have to use the rebuild-lisp.sh script, and then restart the
world build process with build-world.sh
Starts a complete world build for the given target, using the lisp
binary/core specified as a build host. The recompilation step will
only recompile changed files, or files for which the fasl files are
missing. It will also not recompile the C runtime code (the lisp
binary). If a (re)compilation of that code is needed, the genesis
step of the world build will inform you of that fact. In that case,
you'll have to use the rebuild-lisp.sh script, and then restart the
world build process with build-world.sh
* bin/rebuild-lisp.sh target-directory
This script will force a complete recompilation of the C runtime code
of CMU CL (aka the lisp executable). Doing this will necessitate
building a new kernel.core file, using build-world.sh.
This script will force a complete recompilation of the C runtime code
of CMU CL (aka the lisp executable). Doing this will necessitate
building a new kernel.core file, using build-world.sh.
* bin/load-world.sh target-directory version
This will finish the CMU CL rebuilding process, by loading the
remaining compiled files generated in the world build process into the
kernel.core file, that also resulted from that process, creating the
final lisp.core file.
This will finish the CMU CL rebuilding process, by loading the
remaining compiled files generated in the world build process into the
kernel.core file, that also resulted from that process, creating the
final lisp.core file.
You have to pass the version string as a second argument. The dumped
core will anounce itself using that string. Please don't use a string
consisting of an official release name only, (e.g. "18d"), since those
are reserved for official release builds. Including the build-date in
ISO8601 format is often a good idea, e.g. "18d+ 2002-05-06" for a
binary that is based on sources current on the 6th May, 2002, which is
post the 18d release.
You have to pass the version string as a second argument. The dumped
core will anounce itself using that string. Please don't use a string
consisting of an official release name only, (e.g. "18d"), since those
are reserved for official release builds. Including the build-date in
ISO8601 format is often a good idea, e.g. "18d+ 2002-05-06" for a
binary that is based on sources current on the 6th May, 2002, which is
post the 18d release.
* bin/build-utils.sh target-directory
This script will build auxiliary libraries packaged with CMU CL,
including CLX, CMUCL/Motif, the Motif debugger, inspector, and control
panel, and the Hemlock editor. It will use the lisp executable and
core of the given target.
This script will build auxiliary libraries packaged with CMU CL,
including CLX, CMUCL/Motif, the Motif debugger, inspector, and control
panel, and the Hemlock editor. It will use the lisp executable and
core of the given target.
Note: To build with Motif (clm), you need to have the Motif libraries
available and headers available to build motifd, the clm Motif server.
OpenMotif is known to work.
Note: To build with Motif (clm), you need to have the Motif libraries
available and headers available to build motifd, the clm Motif server.
OpenMotif is known to work.
You may need to adjust the include paths and library paths in
src/motif/server/Config.* to match where Motif is installed if the
paths therein are incorrect.
You may need to adjust the include paths and library paths in
src/motif/server/Config.* to match where Motif is installed if the
paths therein are incorrect.
Unless you intend to use clm and motifd, you can safely ignore the
build failure. Everything else will have been compiled correctly; you
just can't use clm.
Unless you intend to use clm and motifd, you can safely ignore the
build failure. Everything else will have been compiled correctly; you
just can't use clm.
* bin/make-dist.sh [-bg] [-G group] [-O owner] target-directory version arch os
This script creates both main and extra distribution tarballs from the
given target directory, using the make-main-dist.sh and
make-extra-dist.sh scripts. The result will be two tar files. One
contains the main distribution including the runtime and lisp.core
with PCL (CLOS); the second contains the extra libraries such as
Gray-streams, simple-streams, CLX, CLM, and Hemlock.
Some options that are available:
-b Use bzip2 compression
-g Use gzip compression
-G group Group to use
-O owner Owner to use
If you specify both -b and -g, you will get two sets of tarfiles. The
-G and -O options will attempt to set the owner and group of the files
when building the tarfiles. This way, when you extract the tarfiles,
the owner and group will be set as specified. You may need to be root
to do this because many Unix systems don't normally let you change the
owner and group of a file.
The remaining arguments used to create the name of the tarfiles. The
names will have the form:
This script creates both main and extra distribution tarballs from the
given target directory, using the make-main-dist.sh and
make-extra-dist.sh scripts. The result will be two tar files. One
contains the main distribution including the runtime and lisp.core
with PCL (CLOS); the second contains the extra libraries such as
Gray-streams, simple-streams, CLX, CLM, and Hemlock.
Some options that are available:
-b Use bzip2 compression
-g Use gzip compression
-G group Group to use
-O owner Owner to use
If you specify both -b and -g, you will get two sets of tarfiles. The
-G and -O options will attempt to set the owner and group of the files
when building the tarfiles. This way, when you extract the tarfiles,
the owner and group will be set as specified. You may need to be root
to do this because many Unix systems don't normally let you change the
owner and group of a file.
The remaining arguments used to create the name of the tarfiles. The
names will have the form:
```
cmucl-<version>-<arch>-<os>.tar.bz2
cmucl-<version>-<arch>-<os>.extras.tar.bz2
Of course, the "bz2" will be "gz" if you specified gzip compression
instead of bzip.
```
Of course, the "bz2" will be "gz" if you specified gzip compression
instead of bzip.
* /bin/make-main-dist.sh target-directory version arch os
This is script is not normally invoked by the user; make-dist will do
it appropriately.
This is script is not normally invoked by the user; make-dist will do
it appropriately.
This script creates a main distribution tarball (both in gzipped and
bzipped variants) from the given target directory. This will include
all the stuff that is normally included in official release tarballs
such as lisp.core and the PCL libraries, including Gray streams and
simple streams.
This script creates a main distribution tarball (both in gzipped and
bzipped variants) from the given target directory. This will include
all the stuff that is normally included in official release tarballs
such as lisp.core and the PCL libraries, including Gray streams and
simple streams.
This is intended to be run from make-dist.sh.
This is intended to be run from make-dist.sh.
* bin/make-extra-dist.sh target-directory version arch os
This is script is not normally invoked by the user; make-dist will do
it appropriately.
This is script is not normally invoked by the user; make-dist will do
it appropriately.
This script creates an extra distribution tarball (both in gzipped and
bzipped variants) from the given target directory. This will include
all the stuff that is normally included in official extra release
tarballs, i.e. the auxiliary libraries such as CLX, CLM, and Hemlock.
This script creates an extra distribution tarball (both in gzipped and
bzipped variants) from the given target directory. This will include
all the stuff that is normally included in official extra release
tarballs, i.e. the auxiliary libraries such as CLX, CLM, and Hemlock.
This is intended to be run from make-dist.sh.
This is intended to be run from make-dist.sh.
* cross-build-world.sh target-directory cross-directory cross-script
[build-binary] [build-flags...]
This is a script that can be used instead of build-world.sh for
cross-compiling CMUCL. In addition to the arguments of build-world.sh
it takes two further required arguments: The name of a directory that
will contain the cross-compiler backend (the directory is created if
it doesn't exist, and must not be the same as the target-directory),
and the name of a Lisp cross-compilation script, which is responsible
for setting up, compiling, and loading the cross-compiler backend.
The latter argument is needed because each host/target combination of
platform's needs slightly different code to produce a working
cross-compiler.
We include a number of working examples of cross-compiler scripts in
the cross-scripts directory. You'll have to edit the features section
of the given scripts, to specify the features that should be removed
from the current set of features in the host lisp, and those that
should be added, so that the backend features are correct for the
intended target.
You can look at Eric Marsden's collection of build scripts for the
basis of more cross-compiler scripts.
This is a script that can be used instead of build-world.sh for
cross-compiling CMUCL. In addition to the arguments of build-world.sh
it takes two further required arguments: The name of a directory that
will contain the cross-compiler backend (the directory is created if
it doesn't exist, and must not be the same as the target-directory),
and the name of a Lisp cross-compilation script, which is responsible
for setting up, compiling, and loading the cross-compiler backend.
The latter argument is needed because each host/target combination of
platform's needs slightly different code to produce a working
cross-compiler.
We include a number of working examples of cross-compiler scripts in
the cross-scripts directory. You'll have to edit the features section
of the given scripts, to specify the features that should be removed
from the current set of features in the host lisp, and those that
should be added, so that the backend features are correct for the
intended target.
You can look at Eric Marsden's collection of build scripts for the
basis of more cross-compiler scripts.
Step-by-Step Example of recompiling CMUCL for OpenBSD
-----------------------------------------------------
Set up everything as described in the setup section above. Then
execute:
```
# Create a new target directory structure/config for OpenBSD:
bin/create-target.sh openbsd OpenBSD_gencgc OpenBSD
......@@ -487,10 +487,12 @@ bin/load-world.sh openbsd "18d+ 2002-05-06"
# core will announce. Please always put the build-date and some
# other information in there, to make it possible to differentiate
# those builds from official builds, which only contain the release.
```
Now you should have a new lisp.core, which you can start with
```
./openbsd/lisp/lisp -core ./openbsd/lisp/lisp.core -noinit -nositeinit
```
Compiling sources that contain disruptive changes
-------------------------------------------------
......
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment